GDD™ Morning Update: Jimmy Edgar, Flume, Aphex Twin, Mark Ronson

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Jimmy Edgar does “Detroit radio circa 1993″ for his Essential mix
Flume’s new album is “very much underway”
Aphex Twin Kickstarter campaign raises $67,000
Mark Ronson on sampling: “You can’t just hijack nostalgia”

 

Jimmy Edgar does “Detroit radio circa 1993″ for his Essential mix

The Ultramajic boss Jimmy Edgar provided his take on the sound of Detroit for his Essential Mix this weekend.

Jimmy did four different versions of the final product for his appearance on the show, and went through over four thousand tracks in order to pick out the ones he felt fitted best into his two-hour mix.

Ahead of the broadcast, the Detroit-born producer said this:

“This Essential Mix is Ultramajic doing Detroit radio circa 1993. It’s all of my inspirations put into one mix, modernised melodically and meticulously blended.”

Listen  to Jimmy Edgar’s Essential Mix here.

(via Mixmag)

 

Flume’s new album is “very much underway”

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Harley Streten’s self-titled 2012 debut went double platinum, earned him four ARIA Awards at last year’s ceremony, introduced the 22 year-old Sydneysider to the world as a global touring force, and spawned a Deluxe edition with a rap mixtape featuring verses from the likes of Ghostface Killah and Freddie Gibbs.

So it’s safe to say that the world has been keenly anticipating news of Flume’s next LP, and our patience was finally rewarded earlier today with a succinct Facebook message: “New album is very much underway.” The brief message is the first indication we’ve had of a new Flume record since Streten’s closing set at Sydney’s Field Day earlier this year, in which he dropped a mysterious new track reminiscent of his work on Ezra and What You Need.

Since the release of Flume Streten’s hardly been idle, releasing trap bombs like Jaguar andTouched as one half of What So Not with buddy Emoh Instead, and teaming up with Chet Faker for their Lockjaw EP, which spawned the hit Drop The Game, not to mention his recent internet-destroying remix of Lorde’s Tennis Courts.

Speaking with the Guardian last year, Streten revealed that his work on new material was struggling with the conflict between being true to himself and writing guaranteed hits.

“I know how to make a record that commercial radio or triple j will smash now,” Streten said. “It’s kind of hard to stay true, and write what you would write if you didn’t have that in your head. Because I know I can get way more airplay and get this much bigger…and that’s what I’m trying to avoid doing… I just want to write another record that’s as good or better than the one I’ve already made. That’s my main goal, to follow up stronger than before.” Stay tuned for more news on Flume’s sophomore album.

(via inthemix)

 

Aphex Twin Kickstarter campaign raises $67,000

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More than 4,000 Aphex Twin fans have raised US$67,424 to buy a digital copy of the cult producer’s super-rare Caustic WindowLP. 

Kickstarter campaign started back in April after it emerged that a test pressing of the record was going on Discogs for US$13,500. The campaign ended on Saturday, May 10th, with 4,124 backers helping raise more than seven times the original target of $9,300 (those behind the campaign had talked the seller down to that price). The campaign was undertaken with the blessing of Aphex Twin’s record label, Rephlex

The test pressing will now be ripped to digital format and distributed to the buyers. The original vinyl will then be listed for sale on eBay. The proceeds of the eBay sale will be divided three ways between Rephlex/Aphex Twin (as a royalty payment), the Kickstarter contributors and a charity.

(via RA)

 

Mark Ronson on sampling: “You can’t just hijack nostalgia”


In his March appearance at the TED Talks conference, DJ and record producer Mark Ronson defended the widespread use of sampling.

Ronson, whose CV includes work on Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back To Black’ album, believes sampling shouldn’t be looked down upon as long as artists stamp their own unique take on it.

“In music, we take something that we love and we build on it. You have to take an element of those things and bring something fresh and new to it which is something I learnt when I was working with the late, amazing Amy Winehouse on her album ‘Back To Black’.”

Citing obscure track samples as working better, he stated that sampling well-known pop and disco records from the 1980s, using David Bowie’s ‘Let’s Dance’ as an example, often don’t work as well due to the history surrounding them.

“These records don’t really age that well, you don’t really hear them now because they borrowed from an era that’s too steeped in its own connotation. You can’t just hijack nostalgia wholesale”

Watch his talk, broken up with various audio and visual performances, above.

(via Mixmag)

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